Saturday 23rd February 2019

Our Heritage

Our walk through Africa’s Photography history
Our Heritage

Our walk through Africa’s Photography history

In Our walk through Africa’s Photography History, we see that the earliest surviving photographs from Africa are mostly of Egyptian monuments. At this period exposures needed to be several minutes long, and almost all photographs were taken out of doors. The earliest surviving photograph of a black African is a daguerrotype of a female chief…

Ernest Cole, photographer of apartheid
Our Heritage

Ernest Cole, photographer of apartheid

In the introduction to his only book, “House of Bondage” (1967), South African photographer Ernest Cole, who would soon be forced into exile, wrote, “You may escape but you carry your prison smell with you.” His powerful images and the tragic ending of his life 22 years later open a window on how blacks lived…

Obie Oberholzer
Our Heritage

Obie Oberholzer

In his own words…. Born on a farm in South Africa, on the 26th of August 1947 to be exact, I spent most of my first eight years running around barefoot like a wild little madman. Later, I went to an English High School and started wearing shoes and managed to scrape through final exams but…

Mohammed Amin
Our Heritage

Mohammed Amin

Born in Nairobi, Kenya in 1943, as the second son of eight children to a poor railway engineer of Punjabi descent, Mohamed Amin (Mo) was obsessed with photography right from the start. At the age of nine years old, he began saving for a camera which he bought two years later for 40 shillings and at…

Malick Sidibe
Our Heritage

Malick Sidibe

Mr. Sidibé, born in 1936 in Bamako Mali, earned a diploma in jewelry making and then worked in a photography studio of a French colonial. In 1956 he bought his first camera, a Brownie Flash, and in 1957 became a full-time photographer under apprentice with leading society photographer Gérard Guillat , learning his trade at colonial balls and…